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Welcome 2 France Newsletter March 2010
Hello !

March Newsletter Highlights

· Underground and Behind the Scenes at the Eiffel Tower
· Eating Well in the Shadow of the Eiffel Tower
· Cooking at Home with Help from Picard
· A Few Finds in Village Saint-Paul
· Great Reads about Paris
· Calendar of Events for March
· Looking Ahead to April




This Month's Featured Apartments


Champs Elysées - Faubourg St. Honoré



This spacious two bedroom, two bath apartment is located on the prestigious shopping street of Faubourg St. Honoré. It's perfect for two couples.



Trocadero - Poincare II Penthouse



The view from the large terrace of this two bedroom, two bath apartment will lure you outside to enjoy dinner while viewing the Eiffel Tower, Sacre Coeur, the Invalides and the Panthéon.



St. Louis Island III



Enjoy the luxury of quiet on the Ile St. Louis, in a one bedroom apartment that looks onto a peaceful courtyard.




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March, 2010
The weather's warming up in March, the crocuses are springing out of the ground, and few tourists are in the museums and restaurants. It's a great time to be in Paris.

Underground and Behind the Scenes at the Eiffel Tower



Since last year, visitors to Paris have been able to buy their tickets to visit the Eiffel Tower online, with a specific entry time. The long lines to take the lift up the Tower had been a real deterrent for people who wanted to go up into this engineering marvel and symbol of Paris.

Now you can get an even closer look at the Tour Eiffel by booking an hour-and-a-half tour directly on their website. For the price of €20, you hear all the history and romance about the Tower, as well as getting an inside look at how its engineering works. The tours run on Wednesdays and Fridays at 10am and 5:30pm, and the guides speak both English and French.


After meeting the guide, you cross the street away from the Tower onto the grassy Champs de Mars and enter the underground bunkers where the control rooms are located. Marching through tunnels, you learn all about what it takes to keep the Tower running and see how it's done. You even get a glimpse of the kitchens of the famous Jules Verne restaurant down here; crates of food and supplies are stored in the halls.

You emerge into the light and go up the lift to the first floor, 190 feet above the ground. The guide tells you about the mechanics of the elevators and how they're maintained. You go behind the areas where tourists are permitted, walking on catwalks high above the city. If you take the last tour of the day during winter, you just might still be in the Tower when the twinkling lights fire up.

The tour ends here at the first level. I suggest you pre-book a standard lift ticket to take you higher up when you book your tour. The gift shop is located on this level, as is the restaurant 58 (so named because it's 58 meters above Paris). Depending on when you're there, you might want to stop in for lunch; no reservations are needed, and lunch prices run about €15 for a main course or €17.50 for two courses.

Some people love 58; others hate it. What people love is the simple menu and fixed price value at lunch - and, of course, the view. What others hate is that the appetizers and desserts are served buffet style. It's your choice, but it certainly is a beautiful setting.

You must reserve in advance for this tour, preferably a month or so early, especially in the busy months. On the Eiffel Tower website (tour-eiffel.fr), information about the tour is a bit hard to find. In the menu on the left-hand side, click on Espace Professionel (or Professional Services in the English version), then on Coulisses de la Tour (or Behind the Scenes) to find where to sign up.


Eating Well in the Shadow of the Eiffel Tower
The 7th arrondisement, location of the Eiffel Tower, is a popular area for people renting vacation apartments in Paris. There's excellent shopping, the enticing food market street of rue Cler, and many fine restaurants.

When I'm in Paris, I often choose to eat a very nice lunch, and then have a light dinner of wine, cheese and fruit at home. (Some people say this is another reason French women don't get fat; they eat their main meal at lunch and don't eat much at night.) Treating myself to a good lunch also means that I can sample restaurants that would be much more pricey at dinner.

On rue St. Dominique, a block or two west of Avenue Bosquet, is a cluster of fine dining choices. Celebrity chef Christian Constant has several places here: Les Cocottes, Le Violon d'Ingres and Café Constant.


On my last visit, I ate lunch at the least expensive of Constant's offerings, Café Constant, at 139, rue Saint Dominique. It was a weekday, and we arrived without a reservation (not recommended), but after a short wait at the bar, we were ushered to the upstairs dining room. It's much roomier (if roomy is ever a word to associate with French cafés) than the downstairs seating. Mauve walls framed red banquettes, and a long mirror on one wall made the space feel even more open. The tables around us were occupied by a group of serious business men, three young couples out for a fun lunch together, an American man and woman consulting their maps, and two young families with children. The place felt welcoming to everyone.


A plate of devilled eggs went past us to one of the group tables; we immediately wanted one for ourselves. On the menu, the dish was called oeufs mimosa a l'autrefois. The eggs came with a bit of salad on the side, and they did indeed remind of us of the best old-fashioned stuffed eggs we'd had as children.

I learned a new French cuisine word: parmentier, which designates the most elegant little shepherd's pie you can imagine. The parmentier de cuisse du canard croisé came with a thigh and leg of duck, whipped potatoes atop well-flavored chopped duck, and pommes gaufrettes, crispy slices of potato.

For dessert, I splurged on ile flottante, one of my favorite dishes at La Fontaine de Mars down the street. Oddly, this ile flottante was made not of meringue but of marshmallow, so I found it too stiff and too sweet. The lunch service was slow, but we were content to linger. With wine and the shared appetizer, lunch was about €32 each. The café is open from 8:30am - 10:30pm every day except Monday.

On that same visit to Paris, I also had lunch at one of my favorite places, La Fontaine de Mars, down the street at 129, rue Saint Dominique. The restaurant has been at this location since 1908, and it still retains the look of a traditional bistro, with deep pink checked tablecloths, red and yellow cane chairs, leather banquettes and ochre-colored walls.

Again, my friend and I presented ourselves for lunch without a reservation (definitely not recommended, but always worth a shot when it's off season). We received a warm welcome, and although the place was bustling, a table was quickly found for us.

Specialities here are the flavors of the southwest of France. I began my meal with an aperitif of Lillet rouge; it came with a little dish of thinly sliced sausages. The daily specials are quite a bargain; I opted for entrecote de cochon de montagne - a thick boneless pork chop, perfectly grilled, moist and delicious. Not that I'm a pork chop expert, but this may have been the best pork chop I've ever eaten. It came with a side dish of peas and spinach, studded with bacon. (You can see that I definitely threw caution to the winds at lunch.) My special was priced at €20. This was such a generous meal that I couldn't finish it. Too bad that the French don't take doggie bags home from French restaurants; I certainly knew better than to even think of asking.


If you're a fan of ile flottante, this is definitely the place to eat it. (And if you've never had this dessert of meringue floating in crème anglaise, you have a treat in store.) Somehow, at La Fontaine de Mars, they manage to form the meringue into the shape of one of Monet's famous haystacks. Sesame seeds are sprinkled over the top and browned. Dark caramel was swirled through the crème anglaise, and despite my huge chop, I managed to eat every bite of dessert. (The ile flottante runs €9, so it's a splurge in more ways than one.)


Attentive service isn't always a feature of French restaurants, but here we were treated like regular customers. The waiter seemed to delight in helping us choose what to eat, and the hostess came by several times to check on us. They made me want to actually be a regular customer.

A framed news story about the time President and Mrs. Obama ate here hangs on the wall near the stairs. The place is open every day for lunch and dinner.


Cooking at Home with Help from Picard
All of the Welcome2France apartments come with fully-equipped kitchens, so you can visit your local street market for fresh ingredients and whip up beautiful dinners at home. And, of course, many nights you'll want to try the restaurants you've heard about, or just your local bistro.

But sometimes you might just want to eat at home and not go to much trouble. Enter Picard. You've probably seen these stores with their blue snowflake logos all over Paris. But you might not have been tempted to step in. Picard offers frozen foods. That's it. Everything there is frozen. And you're in Paris, one of the great food cities of the world.

But I know Parisians who can make an entire dinner party from Picard by just adding salad and bread. The quality of this frozen food is very high; as I write this, I've just eaten part of a spinach, cheese and pine nuts tart from Picard. It made four servings, and we paid just €4.80 for it. It was delicious.


You wouldn't want to eat from Picard every night. But many French people love Picard, and the bright clean stores offer very enticing choices: shrimp in olive oil with parsley and garlic, €4.80 this week. Lasagna made with goat cheese and spinach, €2.95. You can buy croissants to warm up in the oven, apple tarte tatin for dessert, all kinds of main dishes, vegetables, meats and sweets. You can browse their website for an idea of what's there, and to help you locate the nearest store: picard.fr.

Renting an apartment gives me a big savings on my travels, and Picard helps the budget go even further.


A Few Finds in Village Saint-Paul
Village Saint-Paul, an enclave of small shops tucked away in courtyards and along rue Saint-Paul in the Marais, is a nice area to poke around in if you like antiques and brocantes (a slightly more upmarket version of junk).

The courtyards can be a bit dicey to find. You turn onto rue Saint-Paul toward the Seine from rue de Rivoli (which turns into rue St. Antoine right about there). Walking toward the river, turn right into the arched doorways that lead to a series of interlinked courtyards.

Once you get inside, you'll find over a hundred stores offering everything from mid-century antiques to stores featuring china and home items from several centuries ago. There are lamps and textiles and sculpture and paintings and photographs and linens and dolls and objects from China, Japan and Africa. In other words, you can certainly find something to interest you here.

One store we particularly liked was Cassiopée, Antiques and Brocante "Art de la Table," at 23 - 25, rue Saint-Paul. The store glistens and gleams with crystal, glass and silver, both contemporary and old. Owner Mariane Daudré particularly looks for the famous, classic names in tableware and decorative objects like Baccarat, Christofle, Dome, Lalique and St. Louis. Just talking to her is a delight, because she knows so much history and antique design. (Web: curiositel.tm.fr/75/cassiopee/accueil.htm)



Like most of the stores in the Village, Cassiopée is usually open Thursday through Monday, 11am - 7pm.

In the last courtyard, at 9, rue Saint-Paul, is Comme a la Maison, a tiny pastry shop with outdoor seating, where you can have a light lunch or a cup of killer hot chocolate.

Back outside on rue Saint-Paul is one of my favorite English language bookstores, the Red Wheelbarrow. Unlike my experience at some other English language bookstores in Paris, here we were greeted cheerily when we walked in the door. The young woman behind the desk had plenty of ideas for books to interest us, and she also pointed out a table laden with recent and popular books about Paris.

I've been reading Cara Black's series of murder mysteries since she wrote Murder in the Marais. The Red Wheelbarrow has a nice selection of her books, and they sell fast. The series features Aimée Leduc, a young woman who's a computer forensics specialist - bright, contemporary, tough and vulnerable.

The Red Wheelbarrow is open every day (only in the afternoon on Sunday). Web: theredwheelbarrow.com.

And a few doors down, at number 20, is the most surprising store: Thanksgiving. It's an old-fashioned American grocery with wooden floors and shelves. They carry all the packaged foods and regional specialties that an American expat might yearn for: Kellogg's cereals, Betty Crocker brownie mix, maple syrup, Pop Tarts, Hellman's mayonnaise, Oreos, and Tabasco sauce, for instance. So if you're in Paris with a picky eater, you might just dash down to Thanksgiving for some boxed mac and cheese.



Upstairs, Thanksgiving serves a Cajun brunch on Saturdays from noon to 2:30pm and Sundays from 11am - 3:30pm. Reservations are highly recommended. I haven't eaten there, but it all certainly sounds tempting. The store is open Tuesday - Saturday from 10:30am to 2:30pm, and on Sunday from 11am to 6pm.


Great Reads about Paris
I love to read about Paris and its history, and three recent books will have you wanting to come right back to Paris to visit those historic streets. Paris is so enduring that you can read about events that happened in the 1700s and walk over to those exact places today. They may look a bit different, but the stones still breathe the old stories.

Dancing to the Precipice: The Life of Lucie de la Tour du Pin, Eyewitness to an Era by Caroline Moorehead is a biography of a woman who was born in the reign of Louis XIV and served in Marie Antoinette's court. She and her husband Fréderic fled to America during the Terror, where they lived on a small farm in upstate New York and owned slaves. Back in France, Lucie became a friend of Napoleon, and then had to flee to England when he was deposed. Lucie did finally return to France to end her days.

Moorehead wrote the book using many of Lucie's letters that have been preserved, as well as a memoir Lucie wrote about her life. If this were a novel, you'd say it was impossible for one person to experience so many different political regimes and changes in her life (she was exiled four times).

This is no dry biography. You read about the dramatic ups and downs of Lucie's life and learn the details of everyday life in Paris - both among the wealthy and the poor. Of particular interest to me was "how the mighty have fallen," as Lucie describes the increasingly desperate moves her contemporaries take as they try to stay alive and preserve their property.

Paris Under Water: How the City of Light Survived the Great Flood of 1910 by Jeffrey H. Jackson was written to commemorate the hundred-year anniversary of the last great flood of the Seine. In 1910, Parisians believed that technology and progress had tamed the river. But when heavy snowfalls and unrelenting rain continued for weeks, the waters began to rise.

At first it was exciting to residents to see the surging Seine; they were confident it wouldn't overflow its high banks. And for the most part, it didn't. Instead, the water came up through the sewers and underground Metro tunnels, so the flood covered a wide area in the bowl of the Seine valley. Electricity went down, and the military and aid organizations moved in to the help people driven out of their homes by the flooding. Enormous amounts of foodstuffs and wine, mostly stored in basements, were destroyed, and a panic over bread ensued.

This book describes how the city looked covered in water, and how the city fathers and national government reacted. Mostly drawn from newspaper accounts of the time, it's not as personal a picture as Dancing to the Precipice, but it does give you a good idea of how the infrastructure of the city worked then, and what impact the flood had on decisions that affect today's Paris.

Americans in Paris: Life and Death under Nazi Occupation by Charles Glass is the story of the Americans who elected to stay in Paris when it was taken by the Germans in World War II. Many Americans thought their country's official neutrality in the summer of 1940 would protect them.

Glass shows us the realities of the time by tracing the activities of several people: William Bullitt, US ambassador to France and the only foreign ambassador not to flee before the Nazis arrived; Sylvia Beach, founder of the Shakespeare & Company bookstore who aided Jewish friends and people in the Resistance; Charles Bedaux, a millionaire who tried to play all the angles to protect his business interests; Countess Clara Longworth de Chambrun, related to the U.S. Roosevelts but loyal to Vichy France; and Dr. Sumner Jackson of the American Hospital who gave medical aid - and, under the radar, many other kinds of aid - to Allied soldiers and the Resistance.

There's a lot of detail here, and many interwoven stories, occasionally a bit hard to keep straight. But you get a picture of all the many ways Americans reacted to the crisis, from collaboration to resistance, and how they related to both the Vichy government and Charles de Gaulle's Free French movement.



Note: all the times and fees we've quoted in this month's newsletter were accurate when we published, but things do change, so it's always a good idea to check before you go.



Sheila Campbell, Washington, DC Web: sheilacampbell.com

Do you have a favorite place in Paris you'd like to tell us about for the newsletter? We'd love to hear your suggestions. Just click on www.welcome2france.com/?suggest and give us your ideas.
(Please address all other inquiries to info@welcome2france.com.




Calendar of Events, March, 2010
Art

Through March 7
Isadora Duncan: A Living Sculpture
18, rue Antoine Bourdelle, Metro Faiguiére or Pasteur
€7 (closed Mondays)
Web: bourdelle.paris.fr

Through March 8
Pierre Soulages Retrospective
Centre Pompidou
Place Georges Pompidou, Metro Rambuteau, Hotel de Ville, Chatelet
€12 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: centrepompidou.fr

Through March 8
Artists' Children as Models
Musée de l'Orangerie
Jardin des Tuileries, Metro: Concorde.
€9.50 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: musee-orangerie.fr

Through March 14
Arts of Islam: Masterpieces from the Khalili Collections
Institut du Monde Arabe
1, rue des Fossés-Saint-Bernard, Metro: Cardinal Lemoine.
€10.50 (closed Mondays)
Web: imarabe.org

March 5 - May 24
Holy Russia: Russian Art through Peter the Great
Musée du Louvre, Metro Musée du Louvre or Louvre Rivoli
€9 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: louvre.fr

March 10 - July 19
Lucien Freud Retrospective
Centre Pompidou
Place Georges Pompidou, Metro Rambuteau, Hotel de Ville, Chatelet
€12 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: centrepompidou.fr

March 12 - August 1
From El Greco to Dalí: Great Spanish Masters from the Pérez Simón Collection
Musée Jacquemart André
158, Blvd Haussmann, Metro Miromesnil or St. Philippe du Roule
€10 (open every day)
Web: musee-jacquemart-andre.com

March 15 - June 13
The Hidden Master: Meijer de Haan (1852-1895)
Musée d'Orsay
2, rue Bellechasse, Metro Assemblée Nationale or Solférino
€9.50 (closed Mondays)
Web: musee-orsay.fr

March 15 - June 27
Crime and Punishment
Musée d'Orsay
2, rue Bellechasse, Metro Assemblée Nationale or Solférino
€9.50 (closed Mondays)
Web: musee-orsay.fr

March 18 - 22
Art Paris + Guests
Exhibition partnering with international galleries, foundations and collectors
Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais
3, avenue du Général Eisenhower, Metro Champs Elysées Clemenceau or Franklin Roosevelt
€15
Web: grandpalais.fr

March 18 -July 4
Sculptors Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne
Musée des Arts Décoratifs
107 -111, rue de Rivoli - 1st Arrondissement, Metro Palais Royale - Musée du Louvre
€8.00 (closed Mondays)
Web: lesartsdecoratifs.fr

March 25 - June 21
Toussaint Dubreuil, Henri IV's Court Painter
Musée du Louvre, Metro Musée du Louvre or Louvre Rivoli
€9 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: louvre.fr

March 26 - September 9
Meroe, Empire on the Nile
Musée du Louvre, Metro Musée du Louvre or Louvre Rivoli
€9 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: louvre.fr

Through April 18
Photographer Robert Doisneau (1912-1994), depictions of Parisian life
Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson
2, Impasse Lebouis, Metro Gaité or Edgard Quinet
€6 (closed Mondays)
Web: henricartierbresson.org

Through May 9
Charlie Toorop Retrospective
Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris
11, avenue du Président Wilson, Metro Alma Marceau or Iéna
€9 (closed Mondays)
Web: mam.paris.fr

Through May 16
Pergola: German artist Charlotte Posenenske
Palais de Tokyo
13, avenue du Président Wilson, Metro Alma Marceau or Iéna
€6 (closed Mondays)
Web: palaisdetokyo.com

Through May 24
Turner and the Old Masters
Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais
3, avenue du Général Eisenhower, Metro Champs Elysées Clemenceau or Franklin Roosevelt
€11 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: grandpalais.fr

Through May 24
Paris, the Radiant City (artworks from famous 13th century Paris buildings)
Musée du Moyen-Age/Musée de Cluny
6, place Paul Painlevé, Metro Cluny-la-Sorbonne, Saint Michel or Odéon
€8.50 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: musee-moyenage.fr

Through June 10
Armenian artist Sarkis installations
Centre Pompidou
Place Georges Pompidou, Metro Rambuteau, Hotel de Ville, Chatelet
€12 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: centrepompidou.fr

Through June 28
That's Life: Vanities from Caravaggio to Damien Hirst
61, rue de Grenelle, Metro Rue du Bac
€8 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: museemaillol.com

Through July 18
Edvard Munch Retrospective
La Pinacothéque
28, place de la Madeleine, Metro Madeleine
€10 (open every day)
Web: pinacotheque.com

Through July 4
Brittany: Traveling in Color, Autochromes 1907 - 1929
Musée Albert Kahn
10-14 rue du Port, Boulogne-Billancourt, Metro: Boulogne-Porte de Saint-Cloud.
€1.50 (closed Mondays)
Web: albert-kahn.fr


Exhibitions and Other Museums

Through March 7
Camondo's Splendor from Constantinople to Paris (1806 - 1945)
Musée d'Art et d'Histoire du Judaism
71, rue due Temple, Metro Rambuteau or Hotel de Ville
€6.80 (closed Saturday)
Web: mahj.org

Through March 28
The Paris Flood of 1910 (photographs)
Galerie des Bibliotheques
22, rue Malher, Metro Saint Paul
€4 (closed Mondays)

March 2 - July 11
Frederic Chopin, the Blue Note (Paris years 1831 - 1849)
Musee de la Vie Romantique
16, rue Chaptal, Metro Blanche
Permanent Collection free; special exhibtions €3.30 - 9
Web: vie-romantique.paris.fr

March 18 - November 30
Animal (animal themes and materials in the decorative arts)
Musée des Arts Décoratifs
107 -111, rue de Rivoli - 1st Arrondissement, Metro Palais Royale - Musée du Louvre
€8 (closed Mondays)
Web: lesartsdecoratifs.fr

March 31 - July 5
The Path of Tao: Another Way of Being
Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais
3, avenue du Général Eisenhower, Metro Champs Elysées Clemenceau or Franklin Roosevelt
€11 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: grandpalais.fr

Through May 2
What the Dinosaurs Ate
Le Palais de la Découverte
avenue Franklin Roosevelt, Metro Champs Elysées Clemenceau or Franklin Roosevelt
€7 (closed Mondays)
Web: palais-decouverte.fr

Through May 9
Once upon a Time Playmobil
Musée des Arts Décoratifs
107 -111, rue de Rivoli - 1st Arrondissement, Metro Palais Royale - Musée du Louvre
€8 (closed Mondays)
Web: lesartsdecoratifs.fr

Through May 10
Always Faster: A History of France's Great Locomotives
Musée des Arts et Métiers
60, rue Réaumur, Metro Arts et Métiers or Réaumur-Sébastopol
€6.50 (closed Mondays)
Web: arts-et-metiers.net

Through May 29
20th Century Photographs by Izis
Hotel de Ville
5, rue de Lobau, Metro Hotel de Ville
Free (closed Sundays)

Through June 10
My Raw Earth for Building Tomorrow
Cité des Sciences
30, avenue Corentin Celtou, Metro Porte de La Villette
€8 (closed Mondays)
Web: cite-sciences.fr

Through July 4
The Impossible Photograph: Paris Prisons (1851 - 2010)
Musée Carnavalet
23, rue de Sévigné, Metro Saint Paul or Chemin Vert
€5 (closed Mondays)
Web: carnavalet.paris.fr

Through July 11
The Art of Being a Man: Male Costumes in Africa and Oceania
Musée Dapper
35 bis rue Paul Valéry, Metro Victor Hugo
€6 (closed Tuesdays)
Web: dapper.com.fr

Through July 11
The Image Factory
Musée du Quai Branly
55 Quai Branly, Metro Alma-Marceau, Bir Hakeim, École Militaire
€8.50 (closed Mondays)
Web: quaibranly.fr


Music, Theater and Dance

Through March 4
John Neumeier's La Dame aux Camélias
Palais Garnier
Intersection of rues Scribe and Auber, Metro Opéra
€6 - 87
Web: operadeparis.fr

Through March 14
Verdi's Don Carlo
Opéra Bastille
Place de la Bastille, Metro Bastille
€5 - 138
Web: operadeparis.fr

March 4 - 28 (various dates)
The Ring Cycle by Richard Wagner
Opéra Bastille
Place de la Bastille, Metro Bastille
€5 - 180
Web: operadeparis.fr

March 8 - April 15
14th Annual Festival of the Imagination (musical artists from around the world)
Maison des Cultures du Monde (and other venues)
101, blvd Raspail, Metro St. Placide or Notre Dame des Champs
Prices vary with artists and venues.
Web: festivaldelimaginaire.com

March 10 - August 1
Paris - Berlin - Hollywood, 1910 - 1939
La Cinématheque Francaise
51, rue de Bercy, Metro Bercy
€6.50 films, €5.00 museum and exhbitions (closed Tuesdays)
Web: cinematheque.fr

March 11 - April 16
Banlieues Bleues Jazz Festival
Various venues in Seine Saint Denis (northern suburb of Paris)
Prices vary by concert and venue.
Web: banlieuesbleues.org

March 17 - 31 (various dates)
Faust by Philippe Fénelon
Palais Garnier
Intersection of rues Scribe and Auber, Metro Opéra
€7 - 138
Web: operadeparis.fr

March 18 - April 11 (various dates)
World Premiere of Ballet Siddharta
Opéra Bastille
Place de la Bastille, Metro Bastille
€5 - 82
Web: operadeparis.fr

March 20 - April 3
Festival Chorus (80 concerts over two weeks)
Grande Arche de la Defense and other venues
Ticket prices vary by concert and venue.
Web: chorus92.fr

March 31 - April 9
Treemonisha by Scott Joplin
Théâtre du Châtelet
1, place du Châtelet, Metro Châtelet
€5 - 80
Web: chatelet-theatre.com



Other

Through March 7
Paris Agricultural Salon
Paris Expo, Porte de Versailles, Metro Porte de Versailles or Balard
€12
Web: salon-agriculture.com

March 14
Paris Spring Hike
Gymnase Henry de Montherlant
32, blvd Lannes, Metro Porte Dauphine or Avenue Foch
€1.80
Web: godillot-familial.com

March 20 - 21
Parc des Princes Antiques Fair
Parc des Princes
24, rue du Commandant, Metro Porte de Saint Cloud
Free
Web: cmo-antiquites.com

March 20 - 21
Tennis Expo
Porte de Versailles, Metro Porte de Versailles or Balard
€10
Web: salondutennis.fr

March 24 - 28
Pavillion of Arts and Design (PAD)
80 exhibitors of painting, photographs, sculpture, jewelry, tapestries and furniture
Jardin des Tuileries
Esplanade des Feuillants?facing 234, rue de Rivoli, Metro Tuileries or Concorde
€15

March 26 - 31
Paris Book Salon
Porte de Versailles, Pavilion 1
Boulevard Victor, Metro Porte de Versailles or Balard
€9
Web: salondulivreparis.com




A Look Ahead for April, 2010
"Saut Hermes" Horse Show, Grand Palais, web: sauthermes.org, April 3 - 4
Trone Funfair, Pelouse de Reuilly, April 3 - May 31
Salon of New Realities (abstract art), Parc Floral, April 4 - 11
Radical Jewish Culture Scene (1980 - 2000), Museum of Jewish History and Art, April 9 - July 18
Bastille Modern Art Fair, April 28 - May 2


We highly appreciate our readers help in making this newsletter as interesting and helpful as possible.
If you have any comments or suggestions, they are quite welcome on our

Comments and Suggestions Page





Thank you for your interest and best regards,

The Welcome 2 France team

www.welcome2france.com
Tel. 1 (650) 267-4328
(free local call number in U.S. or Canada)














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